About Locked Back & Brian Purkiss

Locked Back’s goal is to grow the 2nd Amendment community, preserving it for the generations to come. Locked Back attempts to do this by educating the public at large about the importance of the right to bear arms, as well as educating the firearms community about responsible gun ownership, proper shooting technique, lawful self defense, and related topics.

About Brian Purkiss

Brian is a certified firearms instructor and competitive shooter. Brian will compete in Run and Gun competitions, USPSA, 3 Gun, IDPA, and just about any other shooting sport that looks fun or challenging, although finding the time can be difficult. Brian is one of the founders for the US Run and Gun Association, an organization dedicated to organizing run and gun matches and growing the run and gun format in the US.

Brian has been shooting and competing for many years. He has put in a lot of dedicated effort into honing his shooting proficiency, learning from many different instructors such as Karl Rhen, Tim Herron, Scott Jedlinski, Jacob Bynum, John Daub, TJ Pilling, and more. Secondary only to his faith and wife, becoming a better shooter is Brian’s primary focus. Brian has had several podium finishes at Run and Gun 2 Gun matches throughout Texas and has passed the Texas LTC Shooting Class with his eyes closed.

You can’t buy shooting skill, but what you can do is take Brian’s class. By taking Brian’s class you can save yourself from heartache and frustration while putting you on the right path. I scoffed the idea of taking a shooting class before I took Brian’s class. But now I would highly recommend taking a class with Brian.

Andrew, a Private Lesson Student

“[Brian is] obviously an accomplished shooter and can articulate many things well with respect to run and gun, practical pistol, and self defense.

Run & Gun Workshop Student

Brian teaches classes all across Central Texas, including Austin, Texas and Houston, Texas.


Where Locked Back’s Name Comes From

The name Locked Back comes from the story of Thomas Baker, whose heroism at the Battle of Saipan puts Hollywood to shame. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions, and this is just part of his citation:

On 7 July 1944, the perimeter of which Sgt. Baker was a part was attacked from 3 sides by from 3,000 to 5,000 Japanese. During the early stages of this attack, Sgt. Baker was severely wounded, but he insisted on remaining in the line and fired at the enemy at ranges sometimes as close as 5 yards until his ammunition ran out. Without ammunition and with his weapon battered to uselessness from hand-to-hand combat, he was carried about 50 yards to the rear by a comrade, who was then himself wounded. At this point Sgt. Baker refused to be moved any further stating that he preferred to be left to die rather than risk the lives of any more of his friends. A short time later, at his request, he was placed in a sitting position against a small tree. Another comrade, withdrawing, offered assistance. Sgt. Baker refused, insisting that he be left alone and be given a soldier’s pistol with its remaining eight rounds of ammunition. When last seen alive, Sgt. Baker was propped against a tree, pistol in hand, calmly facing the foe. Later Sgt. Baker’s body was found in the same position, gun empty, with 8 Japanese lying dead before him. His deeds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.