All firearms enthusiasts want to be able to shoot fast, but shooting fast without accuracy is pointless. Quickly acquiring a sight picture is critical for fast aimed fire, both for getting the first shot on target as well as transitioning between multiple targets. This skill is critical for anyone who carries a handgun in a defensive capacity or out on the competitive shooting field.

John Lovell is a very skilled shooter, former special operations soldier with 5 combat tours, and is currently a full time firearms instructor through Warrior Poet Society.

During our draw stroke, the earlier in the presentation we acquire the sights, the less “clean up” we have to do when we’re at full presentation. By getting our sights lined up while we’re extending the pistol, we can have our sights on target much faster by the time our arms are fully extended.

The other important part is having a smooth draw stroke. By pushing our draw stroke out at maximum speed, the pistol sights tend to bounce at the end of the draw stroke. “Slow is smooth, smooth is fast” as the saying goes. We don’t want to go too slow, but keeping a smooth draw stroke allows us to have an overall faster sight presentation than if we push to go too fast.

Practicing through dry fire

This is an incredibly easy skill to practice at home without any range fees or ammo costs. Simply draw a handgun from the holster over and over. During practice, don’t push to try and get the fastest draw stroke ever. Keep it a little slower than ideal during practice so you can pay close attention to each movement of your arms and what they do to the pistol sights.